Saturday, December 19, 2009

Shimizu Ramen

Short note: This is a non-halal entry.
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しみずラーメン (Shimizu Ramen).
My ramen journey took me to another well-known ramen shop in Nagaoka - しみずラーメン (Shimizu Ramen) last Sunday. I know it might sound a little bit crazy to hear how often I visit ramen restaurants, as it has become almost a weekly routine for me lately haha.
This is not my first time at this restaurant as I had come here with Professor Kondo and the rest of my lab mates several months back. That time, it was a treat from Prof. Kondo (told you he is really a nice person; we always get treated haha) as the future path upon graduation for all of us have been decided. It was from that meal that I came to know about Shimizu Ramen.
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The automatic vendor machine at the entrance to the restaurant.
One thing that I noticed so far is that these kind of restaurants that specialise on only one kind of dish on their menu tend to have vendor machines outside their restaurants. Perhaps the reason lies on the fact that they have too many customers, and they cannot affort to go to each customers and take orders from them.
So, the vendor machine will take over the job and they save some time there.
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The interior of the restaurant, which can accommodate approximately thirty people at one time.
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The ticket is bought from the vendor machine, which are then handed to the restaurant worker.
Unlike Aoshima Ramen which offers only one kind of ramen, there are four choices here - とんかつ (tonkatsu) or pork bone, 醤油 (shoyu) or soy bean, 味噌 (miso), and 塩 (shio) or salt ramen. This time, I chose to have tonkatsu ramen for my lunch.
Ramen might not be the most healthy food around, but I somehow have a strong fetish for it. Pardon me for my choice of word here lol. I know I have repeated this far too often already, but give me a bowl of ramen on any day and I would not reject it haha.
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One of the two workers preparing the noodles.
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The sliced char siew before being used as toppings for ramen.

One thing I noticed about the preparation of the noodle in this restaurant is that they do not weigh the noodle for every bowl of ramen, instead they just estimate the amount of the noodle randomly. Very Malaysian-style, isn't it?
One of the main reason I come to Shimizu Ramen is because of its char siew. The noodle is just average but in my personal take, it is the char siew that distinguishes it from other ramen restaurants. The fats is one of the main parts of the char siew which makes it really tender and juicy when we take a bite on them. There is nothing better than to feel the soft meat slowly melts inside your mouth. So far, I would say this is the best char siew that I have ever tasted. Not even the char siew in the highly rated Ippudo can beat this one.
One thing that you got to be ready to do when serving in such restaurant is to wait until your order is served. Sometimes, it could take some time but fortunately, I only waited for roughly ten minutes.
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とんかつラーメン - 普通盛り (Tonkatsu ramen – normal size) - ¥650.
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The noodle is just average, nothing special really.
The topping consist of spring onions and seaweed.
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I ordered a flavoured egg (味付け卵) as side order, which cost ¥50 to be added into the bowl of ramen.

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A closer look at the orgasmic char siew.

Anyone who visit Nagaoka ought to try Shimizu Ramen at least once because trust me, it is really good.

16 comments:

CLF said...

gonna steal the recipe to prepare the 味付玉子!
on side note, I think the Japs prefer slimmer pork, thus it's kinda hard to find a fatty char siew here. :S

calvin said...

@ clf:
i thought that 味付け卵 was just some plain hard-boiled egg, but when i took a bite on it, i was shocked to find the egg yolk inside still remained watery.

personally, i prefer slimmer pork too, but having fatty char siew once in a while is okay, i think. nothing beats the sensation of biting on the soft char siew :)

fufu said...

oh ramen >< i want shio ramen and aka(miso) ramen =p

=chuan guan= said...

da egg...is wtf-omg-tasty-goodlooking-freaking-drooling!!!

calvin said...

@ fufu:
are you a ramen fan too?
actually, i love shio ramen as well.
make sure we go for a ramen meal the next time we meet, even though it could be in germany lol!

calvin said...

@ =chuan guan=:
haha, why are you so over-excited?
but the egg really tasted great!

Ken said...

Looks so tempting.
The egg looks like salted duck egg ler...

Fetish. Orgasmic. Imagination can go wild, u know... Lol

Innocent^^Guy said...

wats the flavoured egg? wat happened to the yolk? wats the thing thats pouring out from the egg?

calvin said...

@ ken:
yes, the egg was orgasmic xD
but it was watery and wasn't really salty as duck egg.

what are you imagining now =P

calvin said...

@ innocent^^guy:
it's hard-boiled eggs simmered inside char siew broth for short period, and then left to cold down inside the broth for long hours.

the egg yolk didn't harden and the yellow thing is the yolk. they call this onsen tamago.

Anonymous said...

the egg looked so gross , i cant eat yolk~y eggs , i prefer my eggs hard and soft

calvin said...

@ anonymous:
different people have different liking.
i'm sorry that the egg isn't your thing >.<

huna said...

imagining masuk nonsense

calvin said...

@ huna:
if that happens, it's time to get some detergent =P

D-Tourist said...

hahaha... just had a tonkatsu ramen @ Tengood restaurant (RM16.80) this evening and guess what.. i came across this blog posting of urs on tonkatsu, tonite... :D ... yummy...though my bowl of tonkatsu didn't quite resembles ur bowl..

Been trying to perfect my skills doing an onsen egg... so far the best way is boiling a medium size egg for 7.5-8.5mins. But the tricky part is puttin the eggg into the boiling water without the egg cracking up from the sudden heat changes.

calvin said...

@ d-tourist:
one thing about the ramen in japan is that it is highly unlikely that you gonna come across two shops that serves the same kind of ramen, although basically their names are similar. each shops has their very own original recipe, hence it makes them special.

i am not an expert in making onsen eggs, but i guess the trick is never put the egg into the pot when the water is boiling, to avoid the egg from cracking ;)